Sci-Café :: International Affairs Office of University of Kurdistan
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Sci-Café

 

Analysis of the Effects and Legal Dimensions o Covid-19 | University of Kurdistan | March 13-14, 2021

📆 Date: March 13-14, 2021

🕚 Time: 17:00  IRST,  14:30 CET



Green Computing and Networking in Cloud and Fog Computing | Mohammad Shojafar, University of Surrey, United Kingdom | March 03, 2021

Webinar Title:
Green Computing and Networking in Cloud and Fog Computing

Abstract:

Cloud computing has emerged as one of the buzzwords in the IT industry and turned the vision of "computing utilities" into a reality. Fog Computing (FC) is a quite novel computing paradigm that aims at moving the Cloud Computing (CC) facilities and services to the access network, in order to reduce the delays induced by service deployments. The emerging FC is extending the CC paradigm to edge resources for latency-sensitive IoT applications. The joint manager of Fog and IoT paradigms will reduce energy consumption and operating costs of state-of-the-art Fog-based data centers (FDCs). FNs include Cloud resources that are provisioned on-demand from geographically distributed FDC. Providing energy-efficient solutions in FDC is still a big challenge that must be addressed. This keynote presentation will cover (a) opportunities and challenges for Cloud Data Centers (CDCs); (b) detail some innovative architectures and their optimal solutions for creating elastic, adaptive schedulers in CDCs; (c) present recent solutions have done to address small-size real-time latency-limited applications in FDCs; (d) experimental results on deploying robust solutions adopted in CDCs/FDCs; and (e) directions for delivering our 21st-century vision along with pathways for future research in Cloud and Fog computing/networking.


📆 Date: March 03, 2021

🕚 Time: 15:00  IRST,  12:30 CET

✔ Language: Persian

Organizing By: Department of Computer Engineering and IT, Faculty of Engineering 

Coordinator: Dr. Sadoon Azizi 


Presenter: Dr. Mohammad Shojafar, Associate Professor at the 6G Innovation Centre (6GIC), University of Surrey, United Kingdom

Email: m.shojafar@surrey.ac.uk 


Biography:
Mohammad Shojafar is an Associate Professor in Network Security, IEEE Senior Member, Professional ACM member, an Intel Innovator working in the 6G Innovation Centre (6GIC) at the University of Surrey, United Kingdom. Before joining 6GIC, he was a Senior Researcher and a Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Padua, Italy. He was a Senior Researcher working on a network security project jointly with Ryerson University and Telus Communications Inc (TELUS) in Toronto, Canada, in 2019. He was CNIT Senior Researcher at the University of Rome Tor Vergata contributed to European H2020 “SUPERFLUIDITY” project. Dr. Mohammad was a Principal Investigator (PI) of the PRISENODE project, a 275,000-euro Horizon Marie Curie project in the areas of Fog/Cloud security collaborating at the University of Padua, Italy. He also was a PI on an Italian SDN security and privacy (60,000 euro) supported by the University of Padua in 2018. He also was contributed to some Italian projects in telecommunications like GAUChO — A Green Adaptive Fog Computing and Networking Architecture (400,000 euro), S2C: Secure, Software-defined Cloud (30,000 euro), and SAMMClouds-Secure and Adaptive Management of Multi-Clouds (30,000 euro). His main research interest is in the area of green networking and network security and privacy. He published more than 120+ papers in topmost international peer-reviewed journals and conferences in this area, e.g., IEEE TCC, IEEE TII, IEEE TNSM, IEEE T-ITS, IEEE IOTJ, IEEE TGCN, IEEE INFOCOM, and IEEE ICC/GLOBECOM (h-index=30, 3.5k+ citations). In 2016, he received his Ph.D. in ICT from the Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, with an ‘Excellent’ assessment. He is an Associate Editor in IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics, Computer Networks, Cluster Computing, and IET Communications. For additional information: http://mshojafar.com.



Peace Education in TESOL | Saeed Rezaei, Sharif University of Technology | March 03, 2021

Webinar Title:
Peace Education in TESOL

Abstract:

According to the war child organization in the UK, 75 million children and young people need urgent educational support, ¼ of children in the world live in areas affected by the crisis, 77% of refugee adolescents are not enrolled in secondary schools, and 99% refugee youths worldwide are not attending universities. While many countries, including Syria and Yemen in the Middle East, have turned into conflict zones, educationalists should not be disappointed and persevere to incorporate peace education tenets in their teaching practice. In this presentation, I will present a case study research on peace education in an English language class at the Sharif University of Technology and how peace elements were implemented in the syllabus. The participants included 15 English language learners (7 male and 8 female) from the fields of science and engineering who had enrolled in a minor English language program course. The data were collected through a pre-course post-course interview, students’ journals, researcher’s ethnographic field notes and memos, and students’ classroom presentations. The results will be presented qualitatively and its implications for TESOL and education, in general, will be discussed.


📆 Date: March 03, 2021

🕚 Time: 16:00  IRST,  13:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of English Literature & Linguistics, Faculty of Language and Literature

Coordinator: Dr. Jalil Fathi


Presenter: Dr. Saeed Rezaei, Sharif University of Technology

Email: srezaei@sharif.edu


Biography: 
Saeed Rezaei is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics at the Languages and Linguistics Center, Sharif University of Technology. His main areas of research are in sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and social issues in language education. His most recent publications have appeared in Open Learning, ReCALL, Asian Englishes, Higher Education, TESOL Quarterly, Teaching and Teacher Education, Journal of Multilingual & Multicultural Development, New Writing, and Multilingual. He has presented talks in different universities including the University of Technology Sydney, University of Amsterdam, University of Murcia, University of Auckland, University of Leiden, and the University of Kobe.



Controlling microstructure and mechanical properties of high value components during manufacturing | Salah Rahimi, University of Strathclyde | March 03, 2021

Webinar Title:

Controlling microstructure and mechanical properties of high-value components during manufacturing

Abstract:

Residual stress, a tensor quantity, are locked-in stresses within a component without external loading, generated as a result of complex non-linear thermal-mechanical processing during manufacturing. Most manufacturing processes introduce residual stress that has a direct bearing on manufacturing (e.g., undesirable distortion) and on the resilience of products in service and their design life. Historically, residual stresses have primarily been incorporated into structure critical component design through a significant safety factor because they are challenging to characterize and control, and there is little design guidance in codes and standards. Consequently, components have thicker sections than needed, increasing the resource use and entry cost of the product as well as the cost of ownership through extra weight. Management of residual stress has the potential to radically improve the sustainability of high-value products not only from the perspective of the level of resources used but also in terms of their through-life impact on the environment. Residual stresses are rather challenging to accurately model in an engineering component, compared to in-service applied stresses. Despite all the advances made in modeling and simulations, characterizations and measurements of residual stress are still the corner stone of these developments. This increases the need for appropriate measurement techniques as they are the main means of validation to enhance the confidence of the industrial end-users in the predictive models. This presentation will provide a summary of the generation and evolution of these stresses throughout the manufacturing process of high-value components used for critical applications.


📆 Date: March 03, 2021

🕚 Time: 18:00  IRST,  15:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: International Affairs Office

Coordinator: International Affairs Office


Presenter: Dr. Salah Rahimi, Advanced Forming Research Centre (AFRC), University of Strathclyde, 85 Inchinnan Drive, Inchinnan, Glasgow, UK

Email: salah.rahimi@hotmail.co.uk, salah.rahimi@strath.ac.uk


Biography:

Salah received his undergraduate degree from Sharif University of Technology (Iran) in 2004, and completed his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering, with a focus on environmentally assisted degradations, at The University of Manchester (UK) in 2010. After a postdoc period within the same group, he then joined the University of Strathclyde where he is currently leading the Materials and Residual Stress Team with over 24 staff including Research Fellows, Research Associates, and Manufacturing Engineers.  He is also supervising Ph.D. and EngD students at Strathclyde Engineering Doctorate Centre. His current and most recent funding includes Co-I of the EPSRC funded project (Doing More with Less) on creating a digital twin for forging process (£3.2M), Co-I of ATI funded project (MAMOTH PGB) on manufacturing Power Gear Box for jet engines (£6.9M), PI of an I-UK project (ELF) on manufacturing Extended Lipskins for aerospace (£206K), and PI of +80 projects, worth collectively over £5m, directly funded by industry. He has published over 35 peer-reviewed papers, mostly in microstructure characterization, residual stress measurement & control, and thermomechanical processing.

Salah is a Fellow of The Institute of Materials, Minerals, and Mining (IOM3) and he is registered as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).



Ritual and Performance in Border Areas: Monuments and Artefacts of Zagros as Forms of Rhetoric and Collective Memory | Silvana Di Paolo, CNR Italy | February 27, 2021

Webinar Title:
Ritual and Performance in Border Areas: Monuments and Artefacts of Zagros as Forms of Rhetoric and Collective Memory

Abstract:

The aim of this lecture is to outline through selected and meaningful examples how the Zagros mountains have been acknowledged and understood conceptually as a territorial, social and cultural border between the Mesopotamian lowlands and Iranian highlands. The selected examples, i.e.Bronze and Iron Ages monuments and artefacts pertinent to the Zagros territory (rock reliefs, stelai, cylinder seals etc.), illustrate the conceptualisation of this ‘border’: from a territorially placed boundary/filter between two regions and cultures to a ‘ritualised’ and symbolic border strictly linked to power relations and development of a collective memory.


📆 Date: February 27, 2021

🕚 Time: 19:00  IRST,  16:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of Archaeology , Faculty of Art & Architecture

Coordinator: Mohammad Masoumian


Presenter: Silvana Di Paolo

Email: silvana.dipaolo@cnr.it 


Biography:

Silvana Di Paolo is an archaeologist and art historian of the ancient Near East. She obtained Degree (1992), Post-degree (1994), PhD (2001). Since 2001, she is researcher at the CNR (currently ISPC). She has been Member of the Scientific Council of ISMA-CNR between 2013-2017. Actually, she carries out evaluation scientific activity for MUR and peer-review activity for Viaggiatori Journal (S. Marino University; Université de Grenoble), Athens Journal of History (Athens) and Ash-Sharq: Bulletin of the Ancient Near East (Oxford). She is Director of the Series Biblioteca di Antichità Cipriote, Editor in Chief of the Series ‘Reading Ancient Near Eastern Artefacts’ for Cambridge Scholars Publishing (Cambridge), Scientific Board Member of Ash-Sharq: Bulletin of the Ancient Near East (Oxford), Editorial Board Member of Athens Journal of Mediterranean Studies (Athens) and Rivista di Studi Fenici (Rome). She is also Member of the American Society of the Oriental Research (USA) and Member of the Core Discussion Group of ARWA = International Association for Archaeological Research in Western and Central Asia. As CNR researcher she was/is co-coordinator of different projects in collaboration with European and not-European foreign institutions (France-CNRS, France-Louvre, Spain-MECD, Georgia-SRNSF). In 2014 and 2017 she was Lecturer for the Multi-Disciplinary Education Programme DIPLOMAzia, as a result of a Convention between Italian CNR and the General Director of the Italian Cooperation for Development (DGCS) of the MAE. She was also Member of the Joint Project IULM-ISMA ‘Da Creta a Persepoli’, and actually Responsible (for ISPC-Rome) of the ArCOA Project in cooperation with the University of Milan. Member of the Italian Delegation of the Iran-Italy Science Technology and Innovation Forum (2017), she developed an archaeological project in Iran since 2015 obtaining also financial support by MAECI since 2016. She obtained funds, grants, and fellowships: from the European Social Fund (1995-1996), from the MAECI (1997-1998), from CNR in the framework of the Short-Term Mobility Program (1998, 2007, 2013, and 2017), and funds for educational training (2010-2011), from CNR-MAE in the framework of the Project of Bagdad Virtual Museum (2007-2008), from MIUR for a PRIN project (2010), from the National Endowment for the Humanities (2014-2015) for a research project carried out at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York) in 2015, from the Leventis Foundation (2019) and by the INSTAP (2019) for the publication of the Cypriot Collection in the National Archaeological Museum at Florence. In 2016-2017, she was also Co-coordinator of the Joint International Project (Italian CNR-Georgian SRNSF) in collaboration with the Tbilisi State University. Since 2017 she is co-coordinator for the Italian side of a scientific project in the Western Iran (Kurdistan). She was a member of several archaeological missions in the Middle East. She was supervisor of excavations teams at Tell Mardikh-Ebla (Syria) between 1990 and 2014 (Citadel Wall Fortification, Royal Palace G, Domestic Area B2, Artisanal Area P4, Wall Fortification Z, Western and Northern Fort V, and AA, Western Palace Q), Tell Tuqan in 1993 (Northeastern Gate A), Tell Mozan in 2004 (Mittani Domestic Area), in Lebanon (at Kharayeb in 2013 as responsible of the materials), at Cyprus (Pyrgos in 1997-1998, and in 2013-2104 as responsible of the study of the Early Bronze Age pottery). She has carried out research stays in the United States, France, Spain, Greece, Cyprus, Syria. Her main research interests cover the archaeology and art history of Mesopotamia and Syria on the one hand (3rd-1st millennia BCE) and archaeology of Cyprus and Iran on the other (5th–2rd millennia BCE). Her studies are focused on the material culture, in particular on the relationship between people, ancient landscape and materials/materiality (the impact of things on people’s lives and thoughts), between skill, tradition and innovation (‘creativity’). She has written extensively on: 1) craft production (processes and techniques, social meaning of artefacts/images); 2) the relationship between production and consumption, between continuity (tradition) and change (innovation).



Role of Nrf2 in Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Cancer | Soma Saeidi, Washington University | February 20, 2021

Webinar Title:

Role of Nrf2 in Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Cancer

Abstract:

Oxidative stress and inflammation are closely linked and involved in carcinogenesis. Nrf2, a stress response transcription factor, plays a pivotal role in protecting normal cells against oxidative stress and inflammatory damage. However, Nrf2 can accelerate the growth and progression of transformed or cancerous cells. Nrf2 is stabilized by directly binding to PIN1, a cis-to-trans isomerase. This results in enhanced accumulation of Nrf2 in the nucleus and transcription of target genes involved in cell survival and cancer drug resistance


📆 Date: February 20, 2021

🕚 Time: 11:30 IRST, 09:00 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By:  Department of Biological Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Sciences

Coordinator: Dr. Morahem Ashengroph


Presenter: Soma Saeidi, Washington University

Email: somas@wustl.edu


Biography:

She earned a Ph.D. degree in Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, from Seoul National University. Currently, She has a postdoc research associate at Washington University in St. Louis. She has been investigating the molecular mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention with anti-inflammatory and antioxidative natural products, with a focus on intracellular redox and inflammatory signaling molecules as prime targets. Her research interest focuses on KEAP1/NRF2 oxidative stress response pathway in lung cancer, head and neck cancer, and esophageal cancer. Basic mechanisms, biochemistry, proteomics, drug screens, mouse models, clinical trials.



The Role of “Frequency” in Low-Inertia Power Systems | Federico Milano, University College Dublin | February 18, 2021

Webinar Title:

The Role of “Frequency” in Low-Inertia Power Systems

Abstract:

The webinar is divided into three parts. The first part presents an accurate yet simple and computationally inexpensive formula, namely, the frequency divider, to estimate such frequencies and, thus, improve the fidelity of the conventional power system model for transient stability analysis. The second part focuses on relevant applications of the frequency divider, namely, the estimation of the rotor speeds of synchronous machines and of the center of inertia by means of phasor measurement units as well as the determination of participation factors of synchronous machines to local bus frequency variations. Finally, the third part extends the estimation problem to non-synchronous devices and provides a novel interpretation of the rate of change of power injected at a bus. A practical definition of devices that impact the frequency at their point of connection, namely frequency influencers, is proposed. Relevant applications to the estimation of the parameters of voltage-dependent loads as well as the location of forced oscillations are outlined. The results of several case studies serve to illustrate the behavior of the frequency divider formula as well as the robustness against noise and bad data of the estimation of machine rotor speeds and the utilization of the concept of frequency influencer to identify non-synchronous devices that provide fast frequency response to the system.


📆 Date: February 03, 2021

🕚 Time: 18:00 IRST, 15:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: SMGRC, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Prof. Hassan Bevrani


Presenter: Prof. Federico Milano, University College Dublin

Email: federico.milano@ucd.ie


Biography: 

Federico Milano received from the Univ. of Genoa, Italy, the ME and Ph.D. in Electrical Eng. in 1999 and 2003, respectively. From 2001 to 2002 he was with the University of Waterloo, Canada, as a Visiting Scholar. From 2003 to 2013, he was with the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. In 2013, he joined the University College Dublin, Ireland, where he is currently a Professor of Power Systems Control and Protection. He has authored and co-authored 8 books and about 220 papers and book chapters. He was elevated to IEEE Fellow in 2016 for his contributions to power system modeling and simulation, and to IET Fellow in 2017. He has been an editor of several international journals published by IEEE, IET, Elsevier, and Springer, including the IEEE Transactions of Power Systems and the IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution. He is also an IEEE PES Distinguished Lecturer, since 2020.



Detection and Mitigation of Cyberattacks in Microgrids | Ali Bidram, University of New Mexico | February 08, 2021

Webinar Title:

Detection and Mitigation of Cyberattacks in Microgrids

Abstract:

This seminar addresses the security of distributed secondary control of inverter-based Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) in microgrids. The proposed cyber-secure scheme utilizes the Weighted Mean Subsequence Reduced (WMSR) algorithm at each DER to discard the corrupted information received from neighboring DERs. This algorithm requires the connectivity of the underlying communication graph to be above a specific threshold. To cope with this requirement, a methodology is proposed such that each DER is able to virtually change the quality of communication links connected to that DER to enhance the connectivity of the communication graph.


📆 Date: February 08, 2021

🕚 Time: 19:30 IRST, 17:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: SMGRC, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Qobad Shafiee 


Presenter: Dr. Ali Bidram, University of New Mexico

Email: bidram@unm.edu


Biography:

Ali Bidram is currently an Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA. He has received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. from Isfahan University of Technology, Iran, in 2008 and 2010, and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Arlington, USA, in 2014. Before joining the University of New Mexico, he worked with Quanta Technology, LLC, and was involved in a wide range of projects in the electric power industry. He is an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications.
His area of expertise lies within the control and coordination of energy assets in power electronics-intensive energy distribution grids. Such research efforts have culminated in a book, several journal papers in top publication venues and articles in peer-reviewed conference proceedings, and technical reports. He has received the IEEE Albuquerque section outstanding engineering educator award a New Mexico EPSCoR mentorship award.


The Philosophy of Social Sciences: A critical reflection on its status and role in societal maintenance and transformation | Paul Ilsley, Northern Illinois University -University of Helsinki | January 27, 2021

Webinar Title:

The Philosophy of Social Sciences: A critical reflection on its status and role in societal maintenance and transformation

Abstract:

With the modernization of societies and hegemony of neoliberal discourse in higher education, the role of social sciences in societal maintenance and transformation has been changed and even faced challenges. In higher education institutions, there has been an epistemic battle between social and hard sciences where the role and status of social sciences have been shrunk in both public and academic spheres. In this webinar, we examine the epistemological identity of social sciences in line with its role in societal maintenance and transformation at the age of neoliberal hegemony in the policy-making of higher education institutions around the world. In the Webinar Prof. Ilsley acts as the main presenter, Dr. Mohammadi as discussant, and Dr. Gholami as coordinator.


📆 Date: January 27, 2021

🕚 Time: 17:00 IRST, 14:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of Education, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Coordinator: Dr. Khalil Gholami


Presenter: Prof. Paul Ilsley

Email: paul.ilsley@helsinki.fi


Biography:

Paul is an internationalist, a philosopher of science, an educator, a researcher, and a learner. For 20 years he has served as a Docent with the University of Helsinki in Finland. During the past 40 years, Paul has lived and worked in the United States, Canada, England, China, Korea, and Finland, conducting research, and teaching research and philosophy courses for graduate students. He worked for 21 years at Northern Illinois University as a Project Director and Professor in the internationally distinguished program of Adult and Continuing Education, a founding professor in the program of Educational Research, and Dean of International Programs. He has written extensively in philosophy and social sciences, particularly on phenomenology, civil society, voluntary action, educational philosophy, and future studies. Paul holds deep beliefs in anticipatory and participatory scholarship. He believes social sciences in general, and scholarship in particular, can advance civility, peace, and international cooperation. He has worked for numerous publishing companies, journals, foundations, and academies of science to establish policies and to build and review manuscripts and proposals for funding. He has a keen interest in the role of social sciences whether it is for the maintenance, or for the transformation, of society. His workshop will center on the promises and possibilities of the social sciences for the University of Kurdistan, Iran, the Greater Kurdistan Region, and the world.


More Details:

Jamal Mohamadi is an Associate professor of sociology at the University of Kurdistan. His main research interests are cultural sociology and philosophical debates on social sciences. Dr. Mohamadi is the founding editor of the journal of "Sociology of culture and art" and translator of some main sociological works into the Persian language.

Khalil Gholami, an associate professor of education, is an educationalist and researcher in the field of educational sciences, particularly teaching and pedagogical studies. His main research interests are the philosophy of teaching, epistemological studies in education, and strategic planning and policy-making in higher education. Dr. Gholami has been working with the Universities of Kurdistan and Helsinki since 2009.



The promise and challenges of wearable sensing technology | Hazhir Teymourian, University of California San Diego | January 26, 2021

Webinar Title:
The promise and challenges of wearable sensing technology


📆 Date: January 26, 2021

🕚 Time: 10:00 IRST, 07:30 CET

✔ Language: Farsi

Organizing By: Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences

Coordinator: Prof. Abdollah Salimi


Presenter: Hazhir Teymourian
Email: hazhirteymourian@yahoo.com



Presentation Video:

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables | Saifur Rahman, Virginia Tech, USA | January 20, 2021

Webinar Title:
Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables

Abstract:

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing, and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage, and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable large-scale integration of distributed generation. In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards, and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage, and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.


📆 Date: January 20, 2021

🕚 Time: 18:00 IRST, 15:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: SMGRC, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Prof. Hassan Bevrani


Presenter:  Prof. Saifur Rahman, Joseph Loring Professor & Director Advanced Research Institute Virginia Tech, USA.

Email: srahman@vt.edu


Biography:

Professor Saifur Rahman is the founding director of the Advanced Research Institute at Virginia Tech, USA where he is the Joseph R. Loring professor of electrical and computer engineering. He also directs the Center for Energy and the Global Environment. He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE and an IEEE Millennium Medal winner. He was the president of the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) for 2018 and 2019. He was the founding editor-in-chief of the IEEE Electrification Magazine and the IEEE Transactions on Sustainable Energy. He has published over 150 journal papers and has made over five hundred conferences and invited presentations. In 2006 he served on the IEEE Board of Directors as the vice president for publications. He is a distinguished lecturer for the IEEE Power & Energy Society and has lectured on renewable energy, energy efficiency, smart grid, energy internet, blockchain, IoT sensor integration, etc. in over 30 countries. He is the founder of BEM Controls, LLC, a Virginia (USA)-based software company providing building energy management solutions. He served as the chair of the US National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for International Science and Engineering from 2010 to 2013. He has conducted several energy efficiencies, blockchain, and sensor integration projects for Duke Energy, Tokyo Electric Power Company, the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Defense, the US Department of Energy, and the State of Virginia. He has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Virginia Tech.



Transport Engineering and its Research Trends | Hamed Faroqi, University of Queensland, Australia | January 14, 2021

Webinar Title:

Transport Engineering and its Research Trends

Abstract:

Transportation engineering is a branch of civil engineering that is involved in the planning, design, operation, and maintenance of safe and efficient transportation systems. Transport engineers quantify and optimize our mobility infrastructure networks to meet travel and freight demands, while ensuring safety, equity, and sustainability, at minimal levels of congestion and cost. Transport engineering has now developed into a multidisciplinary field spanning economics, politics, sociology, and psychology, in addition to its core mathematical, engineering, and computational principles. Transport engineering divides into three main subfields of research: Transport Planning, Transport Design, and Transport Operations. This presentation focuses on the general principles of transport engineering, its challenges, and research.


📆 Date: January 14, 2021

🕚 Time: 10:30 IRST, 8:00 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Kaveh Karami

Presenter:  Dr.  Hamed Faroqi 

Email: Faroqi.hamed@gmail.com 


Biography:

Hamed is a Ph.D. graduate from the University of Queensland, Australia. His Ph.D. research focused on transport engineering, GIS modeling, big mobility data, optimization problems, machine learning, smart cities, and transport geography. Also, Hamed has a Civil-GIS MSc from the Khajeh Nasir Toosi University of Technology and a Civil-Surveying BSc from the University of Tehran. Hamed has been productive in research, teaching, and service. Hamed has published several scientific papers in well-known peer-reviewed journals and presented in international conferences. Also, Hamed has experience in teaching both Civil-Surveying and Civil-Transport engineering courses in Iran and Australia. Besides, Hamed has served as a reviewer in several top journals in the field of GIS and Transport engineering.



The application of satellite gravimetric observations for understanding the spatial and temporal variations of water storages | Ala Bahrami, University of Saskatchewan | January 12, 2021

Webinar Title: 
The application of satellite gravimetric observations for understanding the spatial and temporal variations of water storages

Abstract:

Among satellite measurement techniques, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) added a unique component to the existing suite of Earth observations by measuring the redistribution of terrestrial water storage anomaly (TWSA) around the world. Water mass movement can influence the Earth’s gravity in a way that can be observed and quantified by gravity-based measurements. GRACE is a unique data source that can detect the spatiotemporal changes of the Earth’s water storage and improve the estimation of the water cycle at regional to global scales. GRACE observations are fundamental to understand the complex interactions and transitions involved in today's changing climate. Based on the U.S. government’s civilian science programs, GRACE and GRACE Follow-On (GRACE-FO) data cover major application objectives to guide the space-based Earth observations. The GRACE observations have provided unprecedented insight to quantify regional to global water cycle changes from both natural variability and anthropogenic climate impacts on ice-loss, sea-level rise and ocean heat uptake, and the magnitude and frequency of droughts and flood events. GRACE data have been used to improve the accuracy of hydrological and land surface simulations.


📆 Date: January 12, 2021

🕚 Time: 19:00 IRST, 16:300 CET

✔ Language: Farsi

Organizing By: Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Salman Ahmadi

Presenter:  Dr. Ala Bahrami,  University of Saskatchewan

Email: Ala.Bahrami@usask.ca


Biography:

I was born in Sanandaj, Kurdistan (Iran). I received my B.Sc. degree in geomatic (surveying) engineering from University of Tabriz in 2006 and M.Sc. from K.N. Toosi University of Technology in 2009. I was admitted to the University of Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada) in 2014. I accomplished my Ph.D. degree in the field of remote sensing in 2020. My studies in remote sensing provided excellent guidelines for me to become skilled in analyzing different sources of information, such as satellite-based observations and multiple sources of data. Apart from my background in remote sensing, my desire for physical hydrology and environment modeling motivated me to focus on the data assimilation topic that bridges satellite-based observations with physical model simulations. During my Ph.D. project, I developed a data assimilation framework with a focus on the integration of satellite-based GRACE observations into a hydrology land-surface model in Canada.
Since July 2020, I joined the Global Water Futures (GWF; University of Saskatchewan) as a Postdoctoral Fellow which is the largest university-led water research program around the world. I play a new role in developing and managing hydrological-land-surface-scheme MESH software. During my appointment, I work and collaborate with researchers and engineers at different universities, institutions, and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC).



The pathway of urban water system evolution to sustainability | Farzan GhavamiRad, Deakin University | January 09, 2021

Webinar Title:

The pathway of urban water system evolution to sustainability

Abstract:

Increasing pressure on centralized urban water and wastewater system is leading to demand management techniques and the adoption of alternative sources in the urban area. Therefore, a model is developed to combine decentralized to centralized water and wastewater systems to meet the growing urban water demands in the context of sustainable development. This Integrated Urban Water System (IUWs) with balancing water demand and supply for current and future generations aim to deliver resilience and sustainability to water infrastructure systems. In the current study, rainwater, stormwater, greywater harvesting, and reclaimed wastewater approaches are introduced in decentralized water systems to cope with centralized urban water supply systems for potable and non-potable purposes. Implementing the concept of sustainable development into IUWs is limited to the temporal and spatial dimensions, due to changes of IUWs components and subsystems in the aforementioned scales. Thus, this study with developing a System Dynamic (SD) model in various spatial scales (community, neighborhoods, and household) assessed the behaviors of IUWs temporally and spatially. The use of IUWs may expose threats to human health and ecosystem, while has the potential to decline the vulnerability of urban water supplies and urban infrastructure to cope with droughts and floods respectively. This study analyzed human health, ecosystem, drought, and flood risks in temporal and spatial scales to aid the evaluation of reliability, vulnerability, and resilience of IUWs. These findings are used in the IUWs as indicators to determine the value of sustainability based on various strategy adaptations related to alternative water resources in different scenarios. In the last stage for testing this study, one of a residential area under the service of Melbourne water, Australia was selected to simulate this SD model of integrated urban water (IUW). This examination helps to evaluate different scenarios related to changes in a growing population, urbanization, and economic development as well as climate variabilities in spatial and temporal scales in the context of sustainable development. Currently, this model is presented as a tool for decision and policymakers to evaluate their strategies, in the short, medium, and long-term to deal with the growing urban water consumption on the demand-side and water shortage on the supply side.


📆 Date: January 09, 2021

🕚 Time: 11:30 IRST, 9:00 CET

✔ Language: Farsi

Organizing By: Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Kaveh Karami

Presenter:  Dr. Farzan GhavamiRad

Email: FarzanC@yahoo.com


Biography:

Born & finished high school in Sanandaj. Graduated bachelor & master's degree in Tabriz and UTM UNI respectively. Conducted Ph.D. in Melbourne along with 10-year experience in Industry in Iran, Malaysia, Singapore, NZ & Australia. Member of IEAust, CPEng.




Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Scientific Field | Amit Pawbake, J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry | January 05, 2021

Webinar Title:

Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Scientific Field

Abstract:

First, he will talk about a short introduction to Raman Spectroscopy including brief stories of the discovery of the Raman Effect and C. V. Raman himself. Then, he will explain a general introduction to the application of Raman spectroscopy in different scientific fields. Next, he will talk about his findings: Raman spectroscopy to probe 1) Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Materials 2) Oxidation of Materials 3) Phase Transition 4) unique bonding in the Materials 5) Doping in the 2D materials 6) Magnetic Transition. Finally, he will mention future aspects and recent progress in Raman Spectroscopy.


📆 Date: January 05, 2021

🕚 Time: 09:00  IRST,  06:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences.

Coordinator: Dr. Rahman Hallaj


Presenter: Dr. Amit Pawbake, J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Czech Republic

Email: amit.pawbake@jh-inst.cas.cz


Biography:

Dr. Amit Pawbake received his Ph.D. in 2017 from Pune University, India. He
completed 2-year PostDoc at Institute Neel /CNRS in France during 2018-2020. at present, he is working as Sr. PostDoc at J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Prague Czech Republic.
Dr. Amit Pawbake is a material scientist and he has almost 7-year research
experience in the field of Raman spectroscopy. His research work is focused on the synthesis of 2D materials (Graphene, TMDCs, TMTCs, and Black Phosphorus) and understand its phase transition, lattice vibrations, and anharmonicity through temperature and pressure-dependent Raman spectroscopy. He has completed his Ph.D. on "Raman spectroscopic characterization and analysis of novel 2D materials". Recently He has
started to work on Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and high-pressure electrical measurements and Raman spectroscopic measurements on a different class of materials.
Dr. Amit is connected with many research institutes including Sorbonne Université at Paris FRANCE, JNCASR at Bengaluru INDIA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, RMIT University at Melbourne AUSTRALIA.



Finite Element Modeling of Large Diameter Steel Pipes and the Real World | Himan Hojjat Jalali, University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) | January 03, 2021

Webinar Title:

Finite Element Modeling of Large Diameter Steel Pipes and the Real World

Abstract:

Large-diameter water pipes are integral parts of today’s modern cities and their continuous performance is essential to the resiliency of infrastructure. The increase in water demand due to increasing population in growing cities makes the use of large-diameter pipes and fittings inevitable. However, there are still gaps of knowledge about the behavior and design of large diameter pipes that are not covered by current guidelines and manuals. This presentation will give insight to recent achievements by UTA to address some common issues related to soil-pipe interaction and large-diameter fittings. A well-accepted robust three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) model of large diameter buried steel pipes with the ability to simulate backfill layer placement, compaction effects, consideration of soil-soil and soil-pipe interaction, and its effects on pipe stresses and deflections are presented.


📆 Date: January 03, 2021

🕚 Time: 20:00  IRST, 17:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Arman Mamazizi

Presenter: Himan Hojat Jalali

Email: himan.jalali@uta.edu


Biography:

Himan Hojat Jalali, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the Civil Engineering Department of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). He has a Ph.D. in Structural and Earthquake Engineering from Sharif University of Technology with a focus on the behavior of buried steel pipes subjected to differential ground movement caused by reverse faulting. At UTA he has taught fundamental undergraduate and graduate courses such as Mechanics of Material, Statics, Finite Element Analysis, Advanced Mechanics of Materials, and Structural Dynamics. His current research work includes design and analysis of buried infrastructure, service life estimation of buried infrastructure, and structural control. He is a committee member in UESI/ASCE TC on Seismic Design of Buried Water & Wastewater Pipelines, and also is a volunteer member of AWWA Engineering Modeling Applications Committee. He has given several invited presentations at international conferences and published his peer-reviewed research findings in top ranking journals and conferences.




Biogenesis, structure, and potential function of circular RNAs | Karim Rahimi, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark | December 30, 2020

Webinar Title:
Biogenesis, structure, and potential function of circular RNAs

Abstract:

Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are stable non-coding RNAs with a closed circular structure. They are poorly understood class of non-coding RNAs with functional roles in cell proliferation and development. However, the biogenesis of circRNAs and mechanisms involved in their biosynthetic pathway is mainly unknown. The back-splicing events that form circRNAs are often facilitated by flanking inverted repeats of the primate-specific Alu elements. The ciRS-7 gene lacks these elements, but, instead, we identified a set of flanking inverted elements belonging to the mammalian-wide interspersed repeat (MIR) family. We confirmed the significant effects of MIR elements in the biogenesis of ciRS-7 and proposed that MIR-mediated RNA circularization is used to generate a subset of mammalian circRNAs CircRNAs mainly derive from the same exons as linear mRNA, making it difficult to distinguish the origin of internal exons, especially for multi-exon circRNAs. To elucidate the splicing complexity of circRNAs, we performed deep long-read nanopore sequencing of polyadenylated RNA and circRNA-enriched samples from human and mouse brains and characterized a total of 18,266 and 39,623 circRNAs, of which 2,851 and 11,380 were un-annotated and categorized as novel circRNAs. The circRNA exhibited a large number of novel exons, intron retention and microexon events. CircRNAs are known to be highly expressed in neurons and differentially expressed during neuronal development and in neurodegenerations. They are shown to sponge microRNAs and proteins and involve in transcriptional regulations. CircRNAs play as key role markers in cancer. They also highly and differentially expressed in plants.


📆 Date: December 30, 2020

🕚 Time: 12:00 IRST, 09:30 CET

✔ Language: Farsi

Organizing By: Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Sciences

Coordinator: Dr. Shamseddin Ahmadi


Speaker: Dr. Karim Rahimi

Email: karim@mbg.au.dk



Biography:
Karim Rahimi was born in 1979 in Kurdistan, Sanandaj rural area, Qerekhlar village located at 100 km in North-Eastern of Sanandaj. He awarded his Bachelor's degree in biology (plant biology and production) from Tehran University in 2002. In the same year, he was accepted for a master position in Biotechnology at Tabriz University. During his master, he worked on making transgenic medicinal plants using Agrobacterium. He finished his master's project at the National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology in Tehran. In 2005, he joined the faculty of agriculture at the University of Kurdistan and established a forest biology lab with cell and tissue culture along with a molecular setup facility. In 2007, he joined Sanandaj Azad University as a lecture, and was teaching molecular genetics and biochemistry courses at the departments of biology and food industries. At the same time, he was teaching bioinformatics at the department of biology at the University of Kurdistan. In 2010 he was accepted at PhD student at the Department of Genetics, science faculty, Tarbiat Modares University in Tehran and finished his courses and midway exam in 2012 with a score of 18. At the same time, he was working on a project making miR-302 transgenic mice at the Kurdistan University Medical Science in collaboration with Dr. Fardin Fathi. He left his current PhD position at Tarbiat Modares University and started a new PhD position in 2012 at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus-Denmark, in the lab of Dr. Ernst-Martin Füchtbauer. He awarded his PhD in 2016 working on miR-302 gene structure in humans and mice and studying the function of this microRNA cluster in cancer stem cells. He also started working with CRISPR as a new revolutionary technology in 2015 during his PhD. After PhD graduation in 2016, he started a postdoc position at Aarhus University and joined Dr. Jorgen Kjems's lab as a pioneering lab in non-coding and circular RNA studies. He started several projects working on biogenesis and structural studies of circRNAs. Besides, he started working on circRNAs involvement in neuronal development and their effects on neurodegeneration. For the first time, he developed some methods to sequence full-length circRNAs in human and mouse brain using Nanopore long-read sequencing. He discovered thousands of new circRNAs in human and mouse brain (cortex) samples. He has also developed some methods based on CRISPR Cas13d for circRNA loss of function studies using synthetic gRNAs. He is also working on high throughput mRNA and circRNA knockdown and downstream analysis at the single-cell level. So far, he has published more than 20 papers as the output of his studies and collaborations. He started his academic position in 2020 at Aarhus University, department of molecular biology and genetics, as an assistant professor and continuing working on circRNAs involvements in neuronal developments. He has supervised and co-supervised several masters and phd students since he has started his PhD position at Aarhus University. He has also established international collaboration projects with some universities across the world including the Kurdistan University of Medical Science, Fujita Health University in Japan, Rome University in Italy, Ghent University in Belgium and Utrecht University in the Netherland.



IE Programs at Georgia Institute of Technology | Kamran Payanbar, Georgia Institute of Technology | December 22, 2020

Webinar Title:

IE Programs at Georgia Institute of Technology

Abstract:

In this talk, I introduce the H. Milton School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) at Georgia Tech and present various undergraduate and graduate programs offered by ISyE. I will also discuss some of the faculty research areas in the school.


📆 Date: December 22, 2020

🕚 Time: 16:30 IRST, 14:00 CET

✔ Language: Farsi

Organizing By:  Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Jamal Arkat

Presenter: Dr. Kamran Paynabar


Biography:

Kamran Paynabar is the Fouts Family Early Career Professor and Associate Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Industrial Engineering from Iran and his Ph.D. in IOE and M.A. in Statistics from The University of Michigan. His research interests comprise both applied and methodological aspects of machine learning and statistical modeling integrated with engineering principles. He is a recipient of the Data Mining Best Student Paper Award, the Best Application Paper Award from IIE Transactions, the Best QSR refereed paper from INFORMS and the Best Paper Award from POMS. He has been recognized with the GT campus-level 2014 Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award and Provost Teaching and Learning Fellowship. He served as the chair of QSR of INFORMS, and the president of QCRE of IISE.  He is an Associate Editor for Technometrics and IEEE-TASE, a Department Editor for IISE-Transactions, and a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Quality Technology.



Interactive kinetic façade: Improving visual comfort based on dynamic daylight and occupant's positions by 2D and 3D shape changes | Morteza Hosseini, Eindhoven University of Technology | December 16, 2020

Webinar Title:

Interactive kinetic façade: Improving visual comfort based on dynamic daylight and occupant's positions by 2D and 3D shape changes

Abstract:

Applying active occupant engagement into a responsive façade concept leads us to a transition from the façade regulatory function to the interactive phase. The Interactive facade has the capacity for hierarchically filtering daylight and real-time control and preventing daylight discomfort. Literature referred to the responsive modular elements which can be adapted to dynamic daylight by continuously changing façade configurations. Parametric decentralized façade’s apertures interact with sun radiation based on the relationship between the external environment, interior space, and occupant position as well. The kinetic interactive façade can be transformed based on dynamic daylight and occupant position (functional scenario-based) to meet visual comfort. Also, daylight parametric simulation investigates visual comfort performance provided by the kinetic façade forms through climate-based daylight metrics. The simulation results prove the high performance of the kinetic interactive facades for improving visual comfort regarding the base case. In particular, the three-dimensional shape changes façade provides more visual comfort improvement than the two-dimensional shape changes one regarding Useful Daylight Illuminance, Exceed Useful Daylight Illuminance, and Daylight Glare Probability metrics. Also, the results refer to multifunctional aspects of the three-dimensional shape changes façade, as an advanced interactive daylighting system, which has a capability to control solar radiation in the facade ambient environment for preventing thermal discomfort as well.

Keywords: Kinetic façade, Interactive component, Visual comfort, Dynamic daylight and occupant's positions


📆 Date: December 16, 2020

🕚 Time: 18:00 IRST

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of Architecture and Energy, Faculty of Art & Architecture

Coordinator: Dr. Salah Vaisi

Presenter: Seyed Morteza Hosseini

Email: s.m.hosseini@tue.nl; morteza.hosseini1366@gmail.com


Biography:

Seyed Morteza Hosseini was born in 1987 in Bojnurd the capital city of North Khorasan province, Iran. He graduated from Shomal University with a B.Sc. degree in Civil Engineering in 2010. His research interest during the final years of his undergraduate studies was focused on the structural design. Following his B.Sc. degree, he continued his education at Sariyan Institute of Higher Education and obtained his M.Sc. degree in Architectural Engineering in 2015 with his Master thesis titled “Residential tower design with an emphasis on the connection between structure and architecture”. In his M.Sc. studies, his main focus was on architecture harmony with the climate and building performance and energy modeling. Following a brief period in 2017 where he worked as a researcher at Eindhoven University of Technology   (TU/e), he started as a Ph.D. candidate in the same university in 2018 with the thesis “Development a morphological approach for interactive kinetic façade design to improve multiple occupants’ visual comfort simultaneously”. Seyed Morteza Hosseini (co-)authored 6 ISI journal papers, and 1 conference paper and he is a reviewer for several international and high reputational journals and conferences. Also, he is a technical committee member of the second International Conference on Civil Architecture & Energy Science (CAES 2020), which took place on March 20-22, 2020 in Changchun, China. Morteza has an outstanding ability to develop interdisciplinary research in the field of architecture, daylighting, and energy through parametric thinking and, and his research focuses on developing buildings’ multifunctional components and interactive kinetic facades.



A Path to Research Success (Professional/Personal Self-Development) | Babak Abbasi, RMIT University | December 16, 2020

Webinar Title:

A Path to Research Success (Professional/Personal Self-Development)

Abstract:

This talk will cover the following topics:

  • How to select a successful research career path.
  • How to communicate your research.
  • How to build research network.

📆 Date: December 16, 2020

🕚 Time: 12:00 IRST, 09:30 CET

✔ Language: Farsi

Organizing By:  Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Jamal Arkat

Presenter: Dr. Babak Abbasi

Email: babak.abbasi@rmit.edu.au


Biography:

Babak Abbasi is a Professor of Business Analytics and Decision Sciences at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. He received his PhD from Sharif University of Technology. He has supervised more than 10 PhD students in the area of decision sciences, stochastic modeling, optimization, and supply chain management. His research focuses on industry-motivated quantitative modelling and decision making under uncertainty applied to health care delivery improvement, supply chain coordination, resources allocation, service operations management, and manufacturing.


Presentation File


Participatory Teaching Methods in Online Learning Environments | Omid Noroozi, Wageningen University | December 14, 2020

Webinar Title:

Participatory Teaching Methods in Online Learning Environments

Abstract:

In this participatory workshop, the following topics will be discussed:

  • What kind of graduates do we need?
  • How to adopt our education for qualified graduates?
  • Do we need replacement or transformation of education?
  • Participatory teaching methods
  • How to make our education fun and exciting yet rich?
  • How to summarize key points in a form of evaluation?
  • Questions and answers

📆 Date: December 15, 2020

🕚 Time: 19:00 IRST, 16:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By:  Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, Faculty of Agriculture

Coordinator: Dr. Mohammad Majdi


Presenter: Dr. Omid Noroozi

Email: Omid.noroozi@wur.nl

Biography:

Major achievements of Dr. Noroozi are:

  • Nominee for the teacher of the year (2018-now)
  • Education innovator of the NL institutes
  • More than 20 keynotes in international conferences
  • Editorial board member of several top ISI journals
  • More than 60 top ISI publications with high citation
  • Accomplishing 30 international projects (5 million Euro)
  • Organizing more than 100 international workshops
  • Member of international scientific organization


Machine Learning Pros & Cons | Nima Safaei, Scotiabank, Toronto | December 13, 2020

Webinar Title:

Machine Learning :Pros & Cons

Abstract:

  • Machine Learning Challenges
  • Algorithmic Risks of Machine Learning
  • Root Cause Analysis

📆 Date: December 13, 2020

🕚 Time: 17:00 IRST, 14:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By:  Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

Coordinator: Dr. Jamal Arkat

Presenter: Dr. Nima Safaei


Biography:

Nima has a Ph.D. in Industrial & System Engineering with a background in Applied Mathematics. He held a postdoctoral position at University of Toronto with a focus on solving combinatorics optimization problems. His professional expertise is to solve the large-scale combinatorics optimization problems in different areas such as machine learning, graph theory, scheduling theory, maintenance & reliability engineering, transportation & logistics, airline operations, Finance & banking. He was with Bombardier Aerospace for five years as Data Scientist. He is currently with Scotiabank– DSA lab, as Senior Data Scientist.


Presentation File


An Overview of Traditional and Modern Methods of Construction | Kurannen Baaki, Liverpool John Moores University | December 10, 2020

Webinar Title:

An Overview of Traditional and Modern Methods of Construction

Abstract:

With the recognition of the significant negative impact of the global construction industry on the environment and the demand for housing still a major issue, there is more recognition for the need for greenhouse gas emissions reduction and also ways to provide adequate housing. In the UK, the government is targeting zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Currently the construction industry is responsible for about 47% of total energy consumed in the UK and about 45% of total carbon emissions. It is also suggested that, at the current rate, it will take the UK, for instance, 15 years to close the housing deficit gap, which affects over 8 million in the UK. If we take all of these into consideration, we can understand the significant role the construction industry has to play in curbing our negative impact on the environment while constructing more homes and buildings. Therefore, in this session, you will be introduced to various construction technologies and methods and also modern methods of construction, particularly, the UK context, thus giving you the perspective of the construction industry, methods, and technologies in other parts of the world.

Keywords: Construction technology, Greenhouse gas emission, Sustainable design


📆 Date: December 10, 2020

🕚 Time: 14:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Organizing By: Department of Architecture and Energy, Faculty of Art & Architecture

Coordinator: Dr. Saleh Mohammadi


Presenter: Dr. KURANNEN BAAKI

Email: T.K.Baaki@ljmu.ac.uk


Biography:

Kurannen Baaki is currently a senior lecturer in the School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Liverpool John Moores University where he primarily teaches building technology, procurement and contracts and dilapidations. He has a Higher National Diploma (HND) in Estate Management from Kaduna Polytechnic, Kaduna – Nigeria, a Master of Facilities and Maintenance Management (MFMM) degree from the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, and a PhD in Asset and Facilities Management also from the University of Malaya. Previously, he worked for 3 years in estate surveying and valuation, and property management in Nigeria. Kurannen has research expertise in sustainable facilities management (waste management), strategic facilities management, building refurbishment, and has authored several publications in reputable journals and presented papers at various international conferences. Kurannen is a Graduate Member of the Nigerian Institution of Estate Surveyors and Valuers and an Ordinary Member of the Malaysian Association of Facility Management.


Presentation File: Download


Quantum Optics: electromagnetic waves to photons | Ebrahim Karimi, University of Ottawa | November 24, 2020

Webinar Title:  Quantum Optics: electromagnetic waves to photons


Abstract:

Nearly 160 years ago, James Clerk Maxwell ingeniously showed that electric and magnetic fields are interconnected, and light, the electromagnetic waves, propagates with a constant speed in vacuum. Although various experiments have confirmed that light behaves like a wave upon propagation, classical electrodynamics was incapable of describing several phenomena, e.g., ultraviolet catastrophe, Campton, and photoelectric effects. Note that the latter, within some extends, can be described by classical electrodynamics. In an attempt to describe these effects, quantum theory was initiated by several ingenious scientists. The quantum mechanics formalism was developed in the 1920s to describe the atomic and subatomic world, and since then, the quantum theory remained the most successful theory developed by humankind. Although very few people disagree or question the correctness of quantum formalism as a mathematical model, its foundational aspects still confound physicists even after a century since its inception. Issues such as the nature of the wavefunction and its collapse (in the Copenhagen interpretation), its probabilistic nature (existence of realism), as well as entanglement (non-locality), still inspire debates among physicists and thus pleading a new formalism or proper interpretations. I will review several seminal quantum experiments (mainly quantum photonics) pedagogically. Philosophical questions on the nature of wavefunction, hidden variables theory, entanglement, and spooky action at a distance will be the subject of my talk. Finally, the use of single-photon and entangled photons in quantum illumination will be discussed.


📆 Date: November 24th, 2020

🕚 Time: 17:00 IRST, 14:30 CET

Language: English

Presenter: Ebrahim Karimi, University of Ottawa


Biography:

Professor Ebrahim Karimi was born in Saghez, Kurdistan-Iran. He received his B.Sc. degree in Physics with an emphasis in mathematics from the University of Kerman in 2001, and M.Sc. from IASBS in 2003, and Ph.D. degree from the University of Naples “Federico II” in 2009. He holds Canada Research Chair in Structured Light at the University of Ottawa. His research focuses on structured quantum waves and their applications in quantum communication, quantum simulation, quantum sensing, and materials science. He has published over 140 scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals – including ScienceNatureNature PhysicsNature MaterialsNature PhotonicsNature CommunicationsScience Advances, and Physical Review Letters – and is co-inventor on three patents. His contributions notably include studies pertaining to the relationship between the quantum spatial properties of photons and electrons and their internal properties. He is a member Royal Society of Canada (the College of new scholars), and the Global Young Academy (GYA), a Fellow of The Optical Society (OSA), Visiting Fellow of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light (MPL), Fellow of the National Research Council Canada-uOttawa Joint Centre for Extreme Photonics (JCEP), and adjunct professor in IASBS-Iran. He received the Ontario Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science Early Researcher Award in 2018, the University of Ottawa Early Career Researcher of the Year Award in 2019, and the CAP Herzberg Medal in 2020. Professor Karimi is also an Associate Editor of Optics Express and New Journal of Physics. Applications of structured quantum waves (massive and massless particles) in modern science and technology are the main subject of his research team, the Structured Quantum Optics (SQO) group.


Website: http://sqogroup.ca/

Email: ekarimi@uottawa.ca

Presentation File: Download


Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases | Dr. Kambiz Hassanzadeh, European Brain Research Institute | November 22, 2020

Webinar Title: Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases

Abstract:

 Neurodegenerative diseases are a diverse group of disorders that are characterized by progressive degeneration of the structure and function of the central or peripheral nervous system. The most common of these disorders include Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Huntington’s disease, Motor neuron disease and Prion Disease.

These disorders are the conditions that result in degeneration or death of the nerve cells which causes problems with mental function (called dementia's) or movement. Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people worldwide and it can be severe or life-threatening. Current medications for neurodegenerative disease just can control and relief symptoms of the disease, but they are unable to either prevent progression of the disease or maintain their controlling ability as a long‐term medication.

Recent years have been witnessed a considerable number of studies on the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disease. To find suitable adjuvant and/or alternative treatments, researchers have investigated antioxidative and anti‐inflammatory approaches, since emerging evidence consider oxidative stress and neuroinflammation as leading causes of the development of neurodegeneration. The goal of this lecture is to give an overview on the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disease: current knowledge and future therapeutic strategies.


Date of Holding: Sunday 11/22/2020

Time: 12:00 A.M.

Webinar Presentation Language: Persian

Speaker Email: k.hassanzadeh@ebri.it

Speaker :Dr. Kambiz Hassanzadeh

University / Institute

1European Brain Research Institute (EBRI) Rita Levi Montalcini Foundation, Rome, Italy.

2Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Ian


Speaker Biography

Dr. Kambiz Hassanzadeh was born in 1980 in Sanandaj. He studied guidance and high school at Imam Mohammad Ghazali high school in Sanandaj and in 1998 was accepted in the field of pharmacy at Tabriz University of Medical Science. Soon after graduation, he was accepted as a PhD student in the field of pharmacology. Before graduation he got a visiting research fellowship at department of neuroscience of Karolinska Institute in Sweden. He started his academic position in 2010 at Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences as an assistant professor and then as an associate professor from 2015 till now. In 2019 he joined the professor Feligioni’s group as a researcher for a period of time. His research area has been focused on the neuropharmacology field, and he has published more than 70 papers in the field. As his publications illustrate, he started his research journey on pain management during his PhD thesis. He has studied different mechanisms related to the neuroinflammation and its relevance to pain pathophysiology and management.

Since 2015, Dr. Hassanzadeh has focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. He is working in this field with research on oxidative stress pathways and their contribution in neurodegeneration as a promising target of therapy. Now his research focuses on post translational modification (PTM) and its importance on Tau and α-Synuclein proteins aggregation as pathophysiological hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease.

POSITIONS AND HONORS:

2010: Scholarship as research at Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

2010-2015: Assistance Professor of Pharmacology at Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences

2015-present: Associate Professor of Pharmacology at Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences

2011-2016: Head of Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Kurdistan university of Medical Science, Sanandaj, Iran

2015-present: Head of cellular and molecular research Center, Kurdistan university of Medical Science, Sanandaj, Iran

2018- present: Editor in chief of Scientific Journal of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences

2019- present: Researcher at European Brain Research Institute (EBRI), Rome, Italy

Organizing unit : Faculty of Science

Department :Department of Biological Science

Coordinator : Dr. Shamseddin Ahmadi


Seismic Strengthening of Concrete Structures Using FRP Composites | Mohammad Jalalpour | November 22, 2020

Webinar Title: Seismic Strengthening of Concrete Structures Using FRP Composites

Abstract:

Existing reinforced concrete (RC) structures that do not conform to current seismic detailing requirements carry the risk of nonductile failure modes that can lead to a catastrophic failure of structures.  The behavior of such nonductile structures can be greatly improved by FRP systems to improve the plastic hinges, shear strength and diaphragm elements and connections to minimize the potential collapse risk.

Nonlinear analysis has been widely used to evaluate and retrofit existing RC structures.  Studies have been performed in the past to construct simplified nonlinear behaviors of FRP strengthened structures.  However, there is no unified method to construct backbone curves for FRP confined columns or strengthened shear walls and diaphragms.

This presentation presents the results for dynamic full-scale tests performed of RC structural elements retrofitted with V-Wrap FRP systems. The results of these tests clearly demonstrate the significant improvement of the lateral displacement and energy dissipation capacities of the retrofitted elements.

The presentation also presents a proposed methodology used to construct backbone curves that were utilized to predict the theoretical seismic performance of the retrofitted concrete elements. The proposed methodology follows the principles of the backbone curve development approach in ASCE/SEI 41 by employing sectional analysis to define key points on the nonlinear response curves of the structural elements.

📆 Date: November 22th, 2020

🕚 Time: 10:00 IRST

Language: English

Email: mjalalpour@structuraltec.com

Mohammad Jalalpour

Mohammad Jalalpour, PhD, PE, SE is a Senior Structural Engineer with STRUCTURAL TECHNOLOGIES. He is an accomplished Structural Engineer and Researcher with extensive experience in seismic design and retrofit of structures using conventional techniques as well as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) systems.  He specializes in Displacement-Based Seismic Evaluation and Retrofit of Structures. Dr. Jalalpour's recent work focuses on the development of cost-effective solutions for seismic retrofit of non-ductile concrete structures and diaphragms.  He is actively involved in various ACI committees such as ACI 369, ACI 374, ACI 440, and ACI 562. He often shares his knowledge with the industry through technical presentations.

Research Funding Agencies in Germany | Kaveh Mollazadeh, University of Kurdistan | November 19, 2020

Webinar Title: Research Funding Agencies in Germany

Abstract:

The aim of this workshop is to get acquainted with the funding agencies in Germany in order to receive research grants (research projects, scholarships, fellowships, short-term research stays, research awards, etc.). The limitation of financial resources for conducting scientific researches, the specialization of science, and the tendency to conduct research at the frontier of knowledge have caused some developed countries to provide adequate funds for the development of international scientific cooperation. Germany is one of the leading countries in the European Union in supporting researchers from all over the world to conduct joint research with their researchers. Governmental institutions and organizations, universities and research centers, private industries and companies, international institutions and organizations, NGOs, and charities are the major agencies for supporting research. Due to the frequency of funding agencies, many challenges such as insufficient knowledge of the existence of such agencies and their areas of activity, as well as unfamiliarity with the application process, lead most of applications to be unsuccessful. Therefore, holding training workshops in introducing these supporting agencies can be very useful for faculty members, Ph.D. students, and postdoctoral researchers to help them in reaching their research goals.

📆 Date: November 19th, 2020

🕚 Time: 16:00-18:30 IRST

Language: Persian

Email: k.mollazade@uok.ac.ir

Kaveh Mollazadeh

Kaveh Mollazadeh, University of Kurdistan

Kaveh Mollazade is with the Department of Biosystems Engineering, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj, Iran. He received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering of Agricultural Machinery from the University of Tehran in 2013 and has already published more than 35 scientific papers in prestigious international journals. In addition to conducting national research projects and supervising/advising of the thesis of PhD students from various Iranian universities, he has already been involved in two international research projects with the cooperation of researchers from Germany. Recently, the Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) Foundation awarded him a research fellowship for conducting a research project at the University of Würzburg, Germany. As a graduate of the proposal writing course at the University of Cologne, he has valuable experience in writing the research proposal as well as selecting suitable funding agencies to receive international research grants.

The target group consists of faculty members, Ph.D. students, and postdoctoral researchers from all over the country.

Presentation Files Funding_2019-2020_Barrierefrei | Research Funding Agencies in Germany
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Microgrids Concepts and Control | Nikos Hatziargyriou, National Technical University of Athens | October 20, 2020

Webinar tilte: Microgrids Concepts and Control

Abstract:
Microgrids Concepts and Control

Microgrids, as novel paradigms of active Distribution Networks, have been gaining increasing interest and constitute an active area of research in the last 20 years. Currently, they are considered as key components in power system decentralization, providing viable solutions for rural electrification, enhancing resilience and supporting local energy communities. Their main characteristic is the coordinated control of the interconnected distributed energy resources (DER), which can be realized by various methods, ranging from decentralized, communication-free approaches to centralized ones, where decisions are taken at a central point. This webinar provides an overview of basic Microgrids definitions and historical developments and briefly presents their key benefits from a technical, economic and environmental point of view. It describes the various hierarchical levels and focuses on the technical control solutions proposed for the levels of their organizational hierarchy.

About the Presenter:


Prof. Nikos Hatziargyriou

National Technical University of Athens

nh@power.ece.ntua.gr

Nikos D. Hatziargyriou is a professor in Power Systems at the National Technical University of Athens. He has over 10 years of industrial experience as Chairman and CEO of the Hellenic Distribution Network Operator and as executive Vice-Chair of the Public Power Corporation. He was chair and currently vice-chair of the EU Technology and Innovation Platform on Smart Networks for Energy Transition (ETIP-SNET) representing E.DSO. He is an honorary member of CIGRE and past Chair of CIGRE SC C6 “Distribution Systems and Distributed Generation”. He is Life Fellow Member of IEEE, past Chair of the Power System Dynamic Performance Committee (PSDPC), and currently Editor in Chief of the IEEE Trans on Power Systems. He has participated in more than 60 RD&D projects funded by the EU Commission, electric utilities, and manufacturers for both fundamental research and practical applications. He is the author of the book “Microgrids: Architectures and Control” and of more than 250 journal publications and 500 conference proceedings papers. He is included in 2016, 2017, and 2019 Thomson Reuters lists of the top 1% most cited researchers.

Smart Grids for Smart Cities | Carlo Alberto Nucci, University of Bologna | September 15, 2020

Webinar title: Smart Grids for Smart Cities

Abstract:
Smart Grids for Smart Cities

Smart Grids are nowadays considered as one of the major enablers for the implementation of the Smart City paradigm. This webinar is aimed at providing evidence of the above concept. After a brief introductory part in which the definitions of Smart Grid and of Smart City will be critically reviewed, particular attention will be given to the recent developments of Local Energy Communities and to the technical challenges posed by the management of Micro Grids in islanding transitions. Indeed, Smart districts, smart buildings/homes, and micro-grids (MGs) have still unexploited potential in terms of achieving an overall more flexible energy demand, which represents an opportunity in the sector of energy.

About the Presenter:

Prof. Carlo Alberto Nucci

University of Bologna

Email: carloalberto.nucci@unibo.it

Carlo Alberto Nucci graduated with honors in electrical engineering from the University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, in 1982. He is a Full Professor and Head of the Power Systems Laboratory of the Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi”, University of Bologna. He is an author or co-author of over 370 scientific papers published in peer-reviewed journals or in proceedings of international conferences. Prof. Nucci is a Fellow of the IEEE and of the International Council on Large Electric Systems (CIGRE), of which he is also an Honorary member, and has received some best paper/technical international awards, including the CIGRE Technical Committee Award and the ICLP Golde Award. From January 2006 to September 2012, he served as Chairman of the CIGRE Study Committee C4 System Technical Performance. He has served as IEEE PES Region 8 Rep in 2009 and 2010. Since January 2010, he has served as Editor-in-Chief of the Electric Power Systems Research Journal (Elsevier). He has served as the President of the Italian Group of the University Professors of Electrical Power Systems (GUSEE) from 2012 to 2015. He is presently serving Representative in the Horizon Europe Mission Board Sub-group “Climate-neutral and Smart cities”, and as a member of the Technical Scientific Committee of the Regional Energy Plan of Emilia Romagna Region, Italy. Prof. Nucci is Doctor Honoris Causa of the University Politehnica of Bucharest and a member of the Academy of Science of the Institute of Bologna. He is also serving as vice-chair of the International Conference on Lightning Protection, ICLP.

Perspectives on 5G and IoT connectivity | Petar Popovski, Aalborg University, Denmark | September 9, 2020

Webinar tilte: Perspectives on 5G and IoT connectivity: Ultra-reliability, massiveness and distributed ledgers

Abstract:
Perspectives on 5G and IoT connectivity: Ultra-reliability, massiveness and distributed ledgers

The future wireless landscape, often associated with 5G, envisions three types of connectivity: enhanced Mobile Broadband (eMBB), Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communication (URLLC), and massive Machine Type Communication (MTC). The latter two are seen as two generic types that support the Internet of Things (IoT) communication, putting forward new types of requirements and research challenges, such as protocols that operate with short packets, techniques to achieve and assess extremely high reliability, tradeoffs between massiveness and high-reliability, etc. This set of challenges is further enriched by the advent of distributed ledger technology (DLT), blockchain, and smart contracts that allow autonomous interaction among IoT devices. The consensus protocols that set the basis for blockchain systems are critically reliant on communication, but they change the traffic pattern that has been envisioned for pre-blockchain IoT communication systems. This talk will shed light on the way this connectivity will transform various vertical sectors (energy, industrial production, or similar), provide a perspective on the communication engineering challenges related to the emerging systems for IoT connectivity, and elaborate on the fundamental tradeoffs and outline methods and architectures to solve them.

About the Presenter:

Prof. Petar Popovski
Aalborg University, Denmark
Email: petarp@es.aau.dk

Petar Popovski is a Professor Aalborg University, where he heads the section on Connectivity. He received his Dipl.-Ing and M. Sc. degrees in communication engineering from the University of Sts. Cyril and Methodius in Skopje and the Ph.D. degree from Aalborg University in 2005. He is a Fellow of the IEEE. He received an ERC Consolidator Grant (2015), the Danish Elite Researcher award (2016), IEEE Fred W. Ellersick Prize (2016), IEEE Stephen O. Rice prize (2018), and Technical Achievement Award from the IEEE Technical Committee on Smart Grid Communications (2019). He is currently a Member at Large at the Board of Governors in the IEEE Communication Society. Prof. Popovski is a Steering Committee Member of IEEE SmartGridComm and IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GREEN COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING. He previously served as a Steering Committee Member of the IEEE INTERNET OF THINGS JOURNAL. He is currently an Area Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS. Prof. Popovski was the General Chair for IEEE SmartGridComm 2018 and IEEE Communication Theory Workshop 2019. His research interests are in the area of wireless communication and communication theory. His book “Wireless Connectivity: An Intuitive and Fundamental Guide” will be published by Wiley in April 2020.

Online Science and Engineering Education in the Time of COVID-19 | Dr. Denis GILLET | June 9, 2020

Webinar Title:
Online Science and Engineering Education in the Time of COVID-19

Abstract:

In this talk, the speaker will share the experience gained during the COVID-19 pandemic in delivering all the classes online at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). The issues related to social and digital divide when moving to online education, as well as to the meaning of exams in such a framework will also be discussed. The role of EPFL in supporting digitalization and online education in other Swiss schools will also be presented.

📆 Date: June 09, 2020

🕚 Time: 15:30 CET

✔ Language: English

Biography:

Dr. Denis Gillet received the Ph.D. degree in Information Systems from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) in 1995. While doing his PhD, he was appointed in 1992 as Research Fellow at the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University in the USA. He is currently a faculty member (MER) at the EPFL School of Engineering, where he leads the REACT research group carrying out research activities on digital education and interaction systems. Dr. Gillet was Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies (TLT). He is affiliated at EPFL with the Transportation Center, the Center for Intelligent Systems, and the Center for Learning Sciences. Denis Gillet was the Deputy Coordinator of the H2020 Next-Lab European Innovation Action Project (H2020) and is the Technical Coordinator of the H2020 Go-Ga Innovation Action aiming at promoting STEM education at schools with online labs. Denis Gillet is collaborating with the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) for promotion blended learning and digital skills in executive training for policy makers, government officials and practitioners. He is the father of the Graasp.eu social media platform supporting digital education and knowledge sharing, as well as the co-founder of the Swiss EdTech Collider.

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Power Electronics Technology-Quo Vadis | Frede Blaabjerg, Aalborg University, Denmark | May 26, 2020

Webinar title: Power Electronics Technology-Quo Vadis

Abstract:
Power Electronics Technology – Quo Vadis

The world is becoming more and more electrified combined with that the consumption is steadily increasing – at the same time there is a large transition of power generation from fossil fuel to renewable energy-based which all together challenges the modern power system but also gives many opportunities. We see also now big steps being taken to electrify the transportation – both a better environment as well as higher efficiency are driving factors. One of the most important technologies to move this forward is the power electronics technology which has been emerging for decades and still challenges are seen in the technology and the applications it is used. This presentation will be a little forward-looking (Quo Vadis) in some exciting research areas in order further to improve the technology and the systems it is used in. The following main topics will be discussed

  • The evolution of power devices
  • Renewable Generation
  • Reliability in power electronics
  • Power Electronic based Power System stability

At last, some discussions about other hot topics will be given.

About the Presenter:

Prof. Frede Blaabjerg

Professor in Power Electronics, Villum Investigator, Aalborg University, Denmark

Email: fbl@et.aau.dk

Frede Blaabjerg (S’86–M’88–SM’97–F’03) was with ABB-Scandia, Randers, Denmark, from 1987 to 1988. From 1988 to 1992, he got the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering at Aalborg University in 1995. He became an Assistant Professor in 1992, an Associate Professor in 1996, and a Full Professor of power electronics and drives in 1998. From 2017 he became a Villum Investigator. He is honoris causa at University Politehnica Timisoara (UPT), Romania, and Tallinn Technical University (TTU) in Estonia. His current research interests include power electronics and its applications such as in wind turbines, PV systems, reliability, harmonics, and adjustable speed drives. He has published more than 600 journal papers in the fields of power electronics and its applications. He is the co-author of four monographs and editor of ten books in power electronics and its applications. He has received 32 IEEE Prize Paper Awards, the IEEE PELS Distinguished Service Award in 2009, the EPE-PEMC Council Award in 2010, the IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award 2014, the Villum Kann Rasmussen Research Award 2014, the Global Energy Prize in 2019 and the 2020 IEEE Edison Medal. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS from 2006 to 2012. He has been a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Power Electronics Society from 2005 to 2007 and for the IEEE Industry Applications Society from 2010 to 2011 as well as 2017 to 2018. In 2019-2020 he serves a President of the IEEE Power Electronics Society. He is Vice-President of the Danish Academy of Technical Sciences too. He is nominated in 2014-2019 by Thomson Reuters to be between the most 250 cited researchers in Engineering in the world.

Control, design and cyber-security challenges for DC Microgrids | Tomislav Dragičević, Technical University of Denmark | April 20, 2020

Webinar title: Control, design and cyber-security challenges for DC Microgrids

Abstract:
With the rapid development of power electronics technology to encompass reduced environmental impact, there is a clear tendency to establish high voltage (HV) and low voltage power distribution systems using DC technology – thereby giving rise to a DC microgrid concept. Today, we can find DC microgrids in many areas, from power distribution systems to rural electrification and electrified transportation.
This webinar will address the control and design challenges of DC microgrids. In light of this, practical implementation of the control layers and operational details of several types of DC microgrids with stability assessment techniques will be presented. Also, a number of study cases involving innovative techniques for power architecture design and coordination strategies will be discussed in the first part of the webinar. In line with this, the second part of the webinar will extend the control liabilities discussed in the first part by investigating a new concern, i.e., cybersecurity in DC microgrids and its critical vulnerabilities concerning system instability/shutdown. Further, strategies to detect and mitigate variant cyber-attacks generally injected into the sensors and communication in DC microgrids based transportation systems will be elaborated.
The webinar will also present the view of the instructor on the promising research directions in this area, including a Q&A session.

To

About the Presenter:

Prof. Tomislav Dragičević

Technical University of Denmark

Email: tomdr@elektro.dtu.dk

mislav Dragičević (S’09-M’13-SM’17) received the M.Sc. and the industrial Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zagreb, Croatia, in 2009 and 2013, respectively. From 2013 until 2016 he has been a Postdoctoral researcher at Aalborg University, Denmark. From 2016 until 2020 he was an Associate Professor at Aalborg University, Denmark. From 2020 he is a Professor at the Technical University of Denmark. He made a guest professor stay at Nottingham University, UK during spring/summer of 2018. His research interest is the application of advanced control, optimization and artificial intelligence inspired techniques to provide innovative and effective solutions to emerging challenges in design, control, and cyber-security of power electronics intensive electrical distributions systems and microgrids. He has authored and co-authored more than 200 technical publications (more than 100 of them are published in international journals, mostly in IEEE), 8 book chapters, and a book in the field. He serves as an Associate Editor in the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, in IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, in IEEE Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics, and in IEEE Industrial Electronics Magazine. Dr. Dragičević is a recipient of the Končar prize for the best industrial Ph.D. thesis in Croatia, a Robert Mayer Energy Conservation award, and he is a winner of an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship for experienced researchers.